Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

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nativebrownie
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#1

Post by nativebrownie »

It's that time of year again. In my crowded East, the best escapes are the quiet, small waters, even tiny waters... Wanted to share the liking for these tiniest of places and maybe the small natives that range about these lovely places.

What is so enjoyable for me on tiny waters? Here, in the crowded East ( real crowded where I hang my hat), only the tiny waters seem to avoid the social scene. Tiny waters are beautiful places. Tiny natives are noble warriors. The Boo that fits there can be the most pliant and lovely wand. And with polaroids, it all happens right there - the dart, the grab, and the return to the lair.

What seems to matter? Even though they are awkward, have recently gone to longer leaders - the natives have agreed to that. Odd, unlike all the quick answers in the mags, these natives of the hollows like small fare - #18 - #22 - and from a tip from Mr.Proper, a wet/dry fly (#20) works wonders. Often, those larger citizens just seem to avoid "showing themselves" to a dry and like right under the surface.

Today - a lovely Montague 7.5' Fishkill with a fine story ( probably the exact model/year that my father used right before and after WWII - lost in a later move) - light trout model (loves a 3-4 in close) ... a beautiful hollow... a few smallish beetles... the natives... and the quiet...
Why are your tiny waters special?

NB

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Last edited by nativebrownie on 07/22/09 19:17, edited 1 time in total.

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lstshkr
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#2

Post by lstshkr »

NB, I agree with you 100% - there's nothing like a little sojourn to a tiny stream. There are two that I often go to, and they both have different personalities. But when I visit them, I always take my Granger 7030 Aristocrat - it is the perfect rod for these streams (although I have been known to sneak out a Scott 6 1/2 ft 3wt). One of the creeks is still pretty rough and overgrown, but the other one has had some major work done by the local TU. Here;s a shot of part of the creek last year while in the midst of major habitat improvement:

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While not as rustic nor precipitous as the one you picture, it is still a nice meadow creek. Today, it has grown in nicely and offer some great cover as well as nicely improved habitat for the native Brookies. And here are a couple Brookies that I caught in this little gem of a stream:

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(Pardon the non-cane rod) And this next one is maybe the most colorful trout I have ever caught - same stream but with the Granger from last week:

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The nicest thing about fishing the small waters is that you are seldom interrupted by other anglers. As NB suggested - these tiny waters are special!

Dean D

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nativebrownie
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#3

Post by nativebrownie »

Dean,

Very, very nice. Something really special when habitat improvement adds new life to the natives.. an additional chance to undo some of the past. Yes, I too see a Scott or two in the closet.

One of my favorites is also far less rustic than my pics above. Due to an enlightened community and their work on the banks and local waste water control, I am sometimes startled from my fishing by a lawnmower and a "hi, there." That's fine... they've done a good deed.

I'll post later some of the tiniest waters that I crawl around in - within the canopy there is no casting and it is tough to not startle the brookies as you have to get too close. After a rain, those seepages and tiny headwaters can be visited in summer. A #20 parachute or beetle or mini streamer is all that you need...

NB

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Last edited by nativebrownie on 07/23/09 02:33, edited 1 time in total.

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Cross Creek
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#4

Post by Cross Creek »

I'm finding that brookies will hit tiny flies as easily as big ones, and that I hang up less often with #18 and under. Even sunfish (including the ones with great big mouths) will readily take small flies, and usually don't inhale them all the way to their gullets, which makes for easier unhooking (sometimes miss the crashing strike to big bugs, though). In warmwater areas, there are often some beautiful tiny little hidden spring fed creeks that hold plenty of fish and are virtually deserted by other fishermen. Only thing is . . . "Snakes, why does it always have to be snakes!"
-CC

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Jacktati
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#5

Post by Jacktati »

While reading this thread, I remenber last year after a 10 hours flight an some hours on the road to north Idaho, this tiny crreek we found for our first night again in the USA. Just the right place to rest a little before our 3 weeks fly fishing road trip ;

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uncrowded, but not uninhabited....
this fat fellow wasn't it the best way your wonderfull waters found to say welcome to a little frenchie ?

Image

BobB
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#6

Post by BobB »

good and nostalgic post NB!

Can't add a lot at this point, but like what I see and read!

Bob

p.s. Flykuni2, everyone needs their PalSoji for comic relief!
Last edited by Anonymous on 07/23/09 11:04, edited 1 time in total.

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blacknosedace
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#7

Post by blacknosedace »

I'm lucky in that the two closest good sized streams are considered put and take waters for trout. After mid-June I have most good places (and the holdovers) to myself. I still fish the little trickles, though. I love being in a cool, green place where I know I won't meet anyone else. I tend to go with big bushy flies, because too many of these little fish take small flies deep. I was just here the day before yesterday. Skinny water, but enough fish. It's called Hell Run; forImageImageImageImage me, it's closer to heaven.
If thou hast not caught a trout, this world is to thee, as yet, a blank, existence is a dream. Go and weep. -- Thaddeus Norris

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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#8

Post by Armchair Angler »

July and Aug are usually my best time of year even though here in Central NJ, Summertime is not a good time for Trout - not on our local freestone streams anyway. The advantage of Summertime is that I can get up ultra early (4ish) drive a ways to a cool stream, fish for a few hours and be back before the family chaos begins. Nothing is prettier than a trout stream on an early Summer morning - and the smell is wonderful.

Our little local streams are beautiful but unfortunately most years they get too low and too warm to fish. Plus the trout are stocked, so not many make it too far from the dumping grounds before the locals pull them out. This year however has been the best Summer that I ever remember. There was a severe drop in fishing pressure this Spring and we've had an unbelievable amount of rain - spreading the fish out nicely. (While most people are complaining about all the rain, I keep doing the rain dance.) Now, rather than having to drive an hr or two, I can be on a lovely little freestone stream in 15 minutes. And I have miles (literally) of white pockets and clear pools, each one holding a few trout (plus native small mouths). And I've got it all to myself!! These little streams, when they're flowing, are just like the numerous PA mountain streams and equally pretty. The bug life isn't prolific, but if you want to take trout up top, you'll need a small fly on a long fine leader! Its far easier however, to get them in the fast water with a nymph. It must be Heaven on earth to live next to a genuine trout stream - one that is like this every year! I'm just living it up! If this rain keeps up (and it rained all day today and there's more coming in the next weekImage) these trout will make it through the summer and I'll get to play with them until next year.
Bob

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Ed Pirie
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#9

Post by Ed Pirie »

Love this post- love the replies, love the pictures! I just plain love small brooks and brook trout - but I cannot do snakes -hate 'em.
Thanks for sharing,

Ed Pirie
West Topsham, Vermont

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Greg Reynolds
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#10

Post by Greg Reynolds »

blacknosedace wrote:I'm lucky in that the two closest good sized streams are considered put and take waters for trout. After mid-June I have most good places (and the holdovers) to myself. I still fish the little trickles, though. I love being in a cool, green place where I know I won't meet anyone else. I tend to go with big bushy flies, because too many of these little fish take small flies deep. I was just here the day before yesterday. Skinny water, but enough fish. It's called Hell Run; for, it's closer to heaven.
I fished Hell Run from the mouth to the falls in 2003 and really enjoyed it. Thanks for posting the photos...

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quashnet
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#11

Post by quashnet »

Paul Young said that his Driggs rod was designed for "narrow, brushy streams."

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Please visit and bookmark the Paul H. Young Rod Database
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Other rod databases: Dickerson , Orvis , Powell

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nativebrownie
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#12

Post by nativebrownie »

So nice - sort of a tribute to small places that prove trout live in beautiful places. That's why I wander there, I guess...

Cross Creek, Last wek I realized that bears and snakes are nothing - it's a fall on a slick rock that now scares me. Took the worst fall by far three days ago and I am lucky to be enjoying these pics right now. I should be wiser now... early morning, rock hopping, IT RAINED A BIT THE NIGHT BEFORE, I'm excited. the rocks are moist, I walk on a large table sized rock with a slight slope - feet both suddenly gone forward, (rod held up and out of course -numbskull?), my upper back and shoulders took it all- real HARD. Skull never touched ... a bit achy still...lucky, lucky me.

Flykuni, gorgeous pics - a miracle so close to that Metro area. I can also pull that off relatively close to a Eastern Metro and I feel like a blessed man every day
...

Jackti, a beaut of astream...

Bob, hey... those NC headwaters must be a dream ...

BND, Hell Run - stunningly quiet and nice place to roam on a summer's morning...

Armchair, Yes, we've had all that rain too. What a summer now - you are right. Activates the natives and speads them out nicely...

Ed, on one stream with a canopy, I kept hearing plops ahead of me as I approached. Thought that they were frogs - not so, you get the picture. The fishings so good that I just wear a larger hat and pull my collar up. It's the falls on rocks that now scare me...

Quash, OHHHH... so pretty, layers of the past and important stuff...

Just wanted to stay in touch as we shared the appreciation of tiny waters...

Thought I'd add a pic of a current project - a delightfully delicate Monty Kingfisher 7.5/3/2... Nothing special or collectible but got it for a song and I , from moment one, visualized this rig as right at home with the natives in my smallest hollows - likes a 2 Sylk. Will reset ferrules tonight, most wrappings are done, only lost several intermediates on stripping, added larger guides, hope to color preserve tomorrow... and on from there( I love the ownership mark from the past - hook digs on the cork above the reel seat):

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Last edited by nativebrownie on 07/24/09 10:21, edited 1 time in total.

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TheMontyMan
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#13

Post by TheMontyMan »

I have recently seen a couple of Jay Harvey Montague rods that were wrapped similarly, and similar hardware in 9' 3/2 configurations.

I'll bet this little beauty will be a nice caster!!

. . . Rex TheMontyMan
. . . Rex
The Monty Man

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Ed Pirie
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#14

Post by Ed Pirie »

Native Brownie:

I just love this post. It pulls you in. I have always been a "rock hopper" - that's what I call this small brook fishing. It reminds me of when we were kids and every summer got a new pair of "Chuck Taylor" Converse Allstars. Well, my mother would give me very clear instructions that these new sneekers were not for my brook fishing - and of course, that is exactly what I used them for. I have bad circulation in my legs and last year I thought I was going to have to give up this kind of fishing (afraid of falling on rocks) so I traded a nice little Lew Parks Dickerson 7012 with Jim Bresko at Coldwater Collectables - kind of regret it now although Jim was very fair with me. I traded for a nice Heddon 35 in the 8.5' 2F. My thinking was I was going to have to be doing more fishing out of a canoe on still water. Well, my legs have improved enough so that I can "carefully" keep on brook fishing. In fact the doctor told me that it would be good to be in water up to my hips as much as I could (not quite small brook water, but sometimes). This is how I got to using my longer rods on the small brooks this year and so far I am liking it although I am not fishing where you are bent over all the time due to the canopy. And, you can just keep to yourself about critters that fall off the canopy ahead of you and are not the kinds of critters I like. Vermont has hard winters, but we do not have any creepy things climbing in the trees and waiting to drop on you other than deer ticks - they are bad enough.

And everybody, the pictures are just great! Like I said, this post just pulls me in.

Thanks for sharing,

Ed Pirie
West Topsham, Vermont

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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#15

Post by oldcaner »

nativebrownie wrote:It's that time of year again. In my crowded East, the best escapes are the quiet, small waters, even tiny waters... Wanted to share the liking for these tiniest of places and maybe the small natives that range about these lovely places.

What is so enjoyable for me on tiny waters? Here, in the crowded East ( real crowded where I hang my hat), only the tiny waters seem to avoid the social scene. Tiny waters are beautiful places. Tiny natives are noble warriors. The Boo that fits there can be the most pliant and lovely wand. And with polaroids, it all happens right there - the dart, the grab, and the return to the lair.

What seems to matter? Even though they are awkward, have recently gone to longer leaders - the natives have agreed to that. Odd, unlike all the quick answers in the mags, these natives of the hollows like small fare - #18 - #22 - and from a tip from Mr.Proper, a wet/dry fly (#20) works wonders. Often, those larger citizens just seem to avoid "showing themselves" to a dry and like right under the surface.

Today - a lovely Montague 7.5' Fishkill with a fine story ( probably the exact model/year that my father used right before and after WWII - lost in a later move) - light trout model (loves a 3-4 in close) ... a beautiful hollow... a few smallish beetles... the natives... and the quiet...
Why are your tiny waters special?

NB

Image

Image

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Nice report and you're fishing with my favorite rod too. I've got one 7'6" Fishkill that is waiting for it's new buddy to be equiped with new tips then I'll have two 7'6" Fishkills for local small streams. Both of mine differ from yours only with their green reelseat spacers.

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nativebrownie
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#16

Post by nativebrownie »

Rex, thanks much, again... If you remember when I first posted this rod, you filled me in on the background and then I took your advice and added two guides and went a bit larger ( those thin tips have three 3/0 guides and one 2/0 guide).

Ed, much appreciated... Yes, now that you mention it, the rock hopping and days in the woods do bring me back to more carefree and quieter times. Ah, the escape of a simple, green, and beautiful canopy.. just enter...
And those critters just seem to think that they can fly...

OldCanerods, Thanks... very nice... I do appreciate sharing the words on the Fishkills... there's some beautiful detail work there. Now, 2 light actioned Fishkills, that's too much pleasure... You can probably understand why I was sure to hold the Fishkill up as I fell violently backwards -oddly instinctive. Yet I am sure every forum member would do the same for their cane favorite...right? Yep, we're twisted..

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Soft Hackle
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#17

Post by Soft Hackle »

NB,

Great thread, as is the usual from you!! I don't take a camera fishing so can't share photos of my favorite small streams. I am very fortunate in having several gems near my house that hold nice brookies from 4" to 13" or more. These waters are rarely fished by anyone but me and a couple friends. I love the way I can be drawn in until finally realizing how tired, hungry and thirsty I am. The exercise value of this type of fishing is incalculable as every muscle in my body; legs, core, balance muscles etc. seem to have a role. I do a lot of cycling and a 50 mile ride does not tire me as much as 4-5 hours of small stream wandering. The pool just ahead always looks more interesting than the one I am fishing, especially if it is partially obscured by a fallen log or on a bend in the stream with an undercut carved out around Hemlock roots. I love the coolness of the Hemlock forests in N. England as they suck you deeper and deeper away from the road and your car. I love the delicate smoothness of my Guba / Bacon Payne 97 for these waters but a 7'6" Monty is on my wish list. They don't come up too often and I would love to find a nice one some day.
Last edited by Soft Hackle on 07/26/09 05:43, edited 1 time in total.

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nativebrownie
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#18

Post by nativebrownie »

Softhackle,
Nice to hear your voice... thank you - appreciated...
Interesting as I also tend to "forget or avoid" my camera when I fish. I wish that I knew more of tree types and such - those might be the best shots. I notice that the camera affects my fishing attitude on the smallest waters. I like to quickly release these beauties with merely a turn of the hook and no more - the camera affects that greatly. Just a preference, I guess.
You are vey lucky to have those canopied areas so close... mustbeverynice. Let's see, I have parking areas and new developments that I can visit close to me - tree is a four letter word here now it seems.
Now that you mention it, i agree about the exercise on these smallest waters. On my favorite hollows, major rock obstacles and heavy bushwacking are needed sometimes from small tray sized pool to the next. Major expeditions and constant planning... You're right - great climbing and wandering about. I once (only once mind you) took a new fisher to one of these hollows and ( a great guy btw) and at the end of the afternoon he complained about all the climbing over trees and rocks. His best line though was after he saw a 6 inch native brookie, "That's it?" Then I knew...much...
Yes, we are lucky here, while devestated greatly, the Hemlock hollows are beautiful and the small recesses where tree roots or small rocks hold a native are a marvel for me -"Now, is there one there? No, there... Can't be one there, can there?"
Ah, and with a Payne 97 in hand - all must be well with the world...
NB
Last edited by nativebrownie on 07/27/09 06:30, edited 1 time in total.

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dugdan
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#19

Post by dugdan »

This diminutive gem is most remarkable in contrast to its surroundings. Bracketed by the brassy heat of the Mojave on one side, and hard by the untidy sprawl of suburbia on the other, it is my hiding place of ferns, crisp water and trout.
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And this is how to catch its fish and in turn be captured by its wildness. Stay out of the water, but wade the ferns

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Find a place where the small waters gather and dome a pool with splashes and bubbles

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Then kneel, not only for stealth, but in reverence. Do the unlikely and become smaller, let your heart swell larger in this perfect place. A high backcast, aim the rod tip above the target and watch the fly fall as gently as a whispered prayer, the trout will rise in agreement and soon come to hand

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You can gorge yourself in a small stream like this, plucking trout from every likely pool- to my shame I have before- but there is a better way. After you have known a fish by cradling it briefly in your hand, when you have held loosely a perfect moment , stop and form the conviction "This is enough". Push away from the table, and for dessert savor the perfume of a wild western azalea

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Secret places are precious, held dearly but not forever. Wherever you fish, may you find the freshness of purity...

Doug

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North country brookie
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Tiny Water Stalkers - what to enjoy besides the Boo?

#20

Post by North country brookie »

What a great thread....

Thank you NB and everyone else who shared their places and pictures

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