Wading Staffs

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DUCKMANNM
Master Guide
Posts: 567
Joined: 05/11/18 16:32
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico USA

Re: Wading Staffs

#61

Post by DUCKMANNM »

I made my first wading staff out of an old ski pole. Took that round thingie of the bottom, took the grip off and filled with styrofoam peanuts to deaden the sound. A wading staff is also very useful if you fish where there are cows and farm dogs!

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Fred Kretchman
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Posts: 287
Joined: 05/19/11 18:00
Location: Kittery Point, Maine
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Re: Wading Staffs

#62

Post by Fred Kretchman »

Last year I bought the one sold by REC in CT... Alan Gnann came up with a really great staff: available in two handle styles- one is ergonomically fitted and the other is a spey handle type... the earth magnets that pull the sections together are quick and easy to assemble, and can be done with one hand. Also, comes with 2 different tips- one metal and the other a synthetic for quiet wading. And it is short when folded up in the holster. Absolutely strong too. I sold my Folstaff because it was difficult to assemble quickly, and it got stuck every time I used it so had to carry it onto dry ground to disassemble. REC nailed it on this design.

red 1
Master Guide
Posts: 519
Joined: 09/23/13 19:10
Location: Ct

Re: Wading Staffs

#63

Post by red 1 »

Making my own. Draw knives (?) remove a lot of material quick!
I want to be buried with my favorite rod.
I hear the Styx River has Fish.

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henkverhaar
Master Guide
Posts: 539
Joined: 07/02/16 15:37

Re: Wading Staffs

#64

Post by henkverhaar »

Mmm, not sure that I would want to use sawn wood for a wading staff (unless it really is straight grain, long fiber wood, and I'm absolutely sure that it was sawn totally with the grain). I much prefer full branches (preferably hazel), cut, peeled and seasoned. Then shaved to final dimensions with a drawknife and spokeshave. I've made walking sticks on the lathe from sawn wood, but keep in mind that a wading staff, when used waist deep in fast flowing water, needs to withstand much higher loads than a normal walking stick...

red 1
Master Guide
Posts: 519
Joined: 09/23/13 19:10
Location: Ct

Re: Wading Staffs

#65

Post by red 1 »

It's good oak. The plank I cut to use was from a 150 year or older tree the line crew dropped. It will make some solid wading staffs. The learning curve staff went ok except for a few spots where the drawknife cut more than expected
I want to be buried with my favorite rod.
I hear the Styx River has Fish.

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rhmill01
Sport
Posts: 41
Joined: 02/13/10 19:00

Re: Wading Staffs

#66

Post by rhmill01 »

I have both. The Folstaff did great service but over time the joints wore and had a habit of coming apart when I was in a precarious situation, and the whole staff would collapse on me. So I retired it.

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GrsdLnr
Master Guide
Posts: 527
Joined: 12/07/06 19:00

Re: Wading Staffs

#67

Post by GrsdLnr »

rhmill01 wrote:
07/05/20 13:24
I have both. The Folstaff did great service but over time the joints wore and had a habit of coming apart when I was in a precarious situation, and the whole staff would collapse on me. So I retired it.
Do you still have it? Folstaf repaired mine (cork handle was loose, carbide tip worn to a nub, shock cords stretched out and weak, etc) for $10. Contact Folstaf

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Hsimmons
Guide
Posts: 225
Joined: 06/03/13 14:08
Location: Idaho

Re: Wading Staffs

#68

Post by Hsimmons »

I've used a found beaver-cut willow for six years now that I eventually fancied up with a hemp twine handle, wrist lanyard, a 12-gauge shell on the tip with felt furniture protector stuck on the bottom for traction and multiple layers of True Oil and spar varnish. The staff has a bit of a twisty bend in it which I find good, as it flexes when I have to lean into it hard and then rebounds and tends to push me back upright. I sometimes attach a tether to it on my vest so that it can trail behind me in the water when I am not using it. It's light weight and also floats. Last week the lanyard slipped off my left wrist at mid-stream while I was casting and I didn't notice it until it was long gone. Later that day I found it floating nicely in shallow water next to the bank about 1/4 mile downstream as I returned to the truck. The only downside is that if it's on the tether it can float around my legs and trip me up if I'm not careful.

Image

AlexP
Sport
Posts: 27
Joined: 08/29/19 14:18

Re: Wading Staffs

#69

Post by AlexP »

Hello, for the Folstaf users, do you have issues with folding it back after use?

I have a very hard time pulling the sections apart. I bought it a few weeks ago and have used it about 10 times. The last couple outings it takes me a few minutes to fold it. The two bottom sections are the most challenging. It is a little frustrating. I do like how it performs, I cannot believe I have gone so many years without a wading staff.

Any tricks that users might have if they have encountered the same problem?

Thanks

Alex

putemback
Guide
Posts: 170
Joined: 02/16/12 17:18
Location: SW Montana

Re: Wading Staffs

#70

Post by putemback »

Pull it apart starting at the large, handle end and when it gets difficult to separate the smaller sections, tap the lower carbide tip firmly on a rock or hard ground and the remaining sections will then be easier to separate. Hope the explanation is understandable and helpful
Justin

"I'm suspicious of people who don't like dogs, but I trust a dog when it doesn't like a person."-Bill Murray

narcodog
Bamboo Fanatic
Posts: 1665
Joined: 04/08/07 18:00

Re: Wading Staffs

#71

Post by narcodog »

AlexP wrote:
07/13/20 14:37
Hello, for the Folstaf users, do you have issues with folding it back after use?

I have a very hard time pulling the sections apart. I bought it a few weeks ago and have used it about 10 times. The last couple outings it takes me a few minutes to fold it. The two bottom sections are the most challenging. It is a little frustrating. I do like how it performs, I cannot believe I have gone so many years without a wading staff.

Any tricks that users might have if they have encountered the same problem?

Thanks

Alex
Be sure to wax the joints occasionally.

herkileez
Member
Posts: 20
Joined: 07/01/15 10:41
Location: Campbell River, BC

Re: Wading Staffs

#72

Post by herkileez »

Thin-walled staffs tend to flex and cinch up the insert, making it difficult to separate them when they lock on.

AlexP
Sport
Posts: 27
Joined: 08/29/19 14:18

Re: Wading Staffs

#73

Post by AlexP »

Thanks everybody for the feedback to my question. I will follow the suggestions and hopefully it is just user error.

Tight Lines

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