Elk shanks...

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lloyd3
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Posts: 667
Joined: 03/01/17 15:55
Location: Parker, Colorado

Elk shanks...

#1

Post by lloyd3 »

For years now, when one was lucky or skilled enough to harvest an elk (or deer), the shanks were usually the last thing I would look at in the process of rendering the animal into a state of preservation for future use. Historically, I'd take each shank section apart using a filet knife to carefully extract the slivers of meat from all of the sinew and silver skin. Time consuming and tedious for all the meat you eventually got, which went into the grind anyway. Fast forward to last November, when this lovely creature came home with me...

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The lead cow out of a group of 30 that almost, literally, ran me over. The shot was less than 30 yards with her turning broadside immediately after I mounted the rifle. Reminds me of the old saw "what would you rather be, smart or lucky?". At approximately 400lbs, getting her field dressed and back to the truck was a real test of this old dogs physical plant. I had some help, but only minimal as my buddy is even older (and perhaps more fragile) than me. Suffice it to say that I was pretty tired when the last load made it into the bed of my truck. The next day, my walking around was a pretty good impression of Walter Brennen in "The Real McCoy's". I even passed up a decent shot on another animal (I had a second tag), largely because I was just so darn tired from the previous day's activities.

When the dust from the hunting season finally settled, one of our group of three hadn't filled his tag so the other two of us shared out our kills with him to help fill his larder. Mind you, he's the youngster here and has kept the rest of us in venison for the past several years. Not a hard decision at all. He was very specific in that he wanted the shanks from both of our animals, along with some of the other, more usual and "prime" components. I'd heard about the process he'd planned to use on them but had tried it only once (at a game dinner) a few years before. It was surprisingly good then, but his rendition of it absolutely blew me away recently. Similar to the attached recipe, but without the bones, his version is stunningly good. Savory, fork tender, and a serious treat. Try it sometime. I know I'll never consign that portion of my animals to the grinder ever again.

https://www.themeateater.com/cook/recip ... nks-recipe

jvh
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Joined: 02/18/13 10:50

Re: Elk shanks...

#2

Post by jvh »

I do deer shanks basically the same way. A great way to use them. Works great with neck roasts also.
Vern

lloyd3
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Posts: 667
Joined: 03/01/17 15:55
Location: Parker, Colorado

Re: Elk shanks...

#3

Post by lloyd3 »

My 17-year old son joined me for the first time last December on a deer hunt (sadly, more likely a boredom-related COVID response than any real interest, but...it was a pretty successful trip overall and perhaps I've set a hook, so-to-speak?). Those shanks were saved by me because I'd already donated my elk's to my buddy. Looking forward to trying it myself here soon.

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Brooks
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Joined: 04/07/19 15:58
Location: Idaho

Re: Elk shanks...

#4

Post by Brooks »

Sounds excellent. Lamb shanks are always my favorite—no reason elk shanks wouldn’t be delicious.

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Lee Koch
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Re: Elk shanks...

#5

Post by Lee Koch »

In "Buck, buck, moose," Hank Shaw offers a recipe for braised shanks with garlic. It's fantastic! Now, one of my favorite venison recipes. https://honest-food.net/braised-venison ... pe-garlic/

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