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 Post subject: The Yellow Partridge
PostPosted: 03/26/20 11:30 • # 1 
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Guide

Joined: 12/30/11
Posts: 266
Location: New york
From Brook and River Trouting by Edmonds and Lee #14.

Hook. Alcocks 6812 wet size 14.
Silk Pearsalls gossamer yellow #4.
Body. Yellow silk.
Hackle. Gray Partridge slightly tinged with brown

Image


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 Post subject: Re: The Yellow Partridge
PostPosted: 03/26/20 11:47 • # 2 
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Master Guide

Joined: 03/01/13
Posts: 398
Location: Madison, CT
Nice fly but Yikes! That barb. I would first crush it, in my vice.


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 Post subject: Re: The Yellow Partridge
PostPosted: 03/26/20 13:47 • # 3 
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Bamboo Fanatic

Joined: 06/10/08
Posts: 1393
beautiful


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 Post subject: Re: The Yellow Partridge
PostPosted: 03/26/20 14:50 • # 4 
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Bamboo Fanatic

Joined: 03/23/12
Posts: 4602
Location: Cheyenne OK
klingon wrote:
Nice fly but Yikes! That barb. I would first crush it, in my vice.

The problem with barbs like that on old hooks is they don't crush down but break, and if you're the least bit off when trying to crush them you end up with a lawn practice fly.

I like the fly and have tied softies with most of the Pearsall's silk threads and floss. I'm sure they'd all catch fish if I could get them to trout water.


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 Post subject: Re: The Yellow Partridge
PostPosted: 03/26/20 19:47 • # 5 
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Joined: 12/30/11
Posts: 266
Location: New york
It would be a shame to crush the barb on a hook that is 75 years old |I

Tom


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 Post subject: Re: The Yellow Partridge
PostPosted: 03/26/20 21:09 • # 6 
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Bamboo Fanatic

Joined: 06/08/05
Posts: 4629
upstate wrote:
From Brook and River Trouting by Edmonds and Lee #14.

Image


In Matching the Hatch Schwiebert briefly mentioned the Little Yellow Cranefly and its tendency to emerge on wet days. He recommended the Partridge & Yellow when the Little Yellows were in evidence. It worked well for me in those situations, even in off color water. I usually used one tied with a fur thorax.


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 Post subject: Re: The Yellow Partridge
PostPosted: 03/26/20 21:16 • # 7 
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Master Guide

Joined: 03/13/15
Posts: 796
Location: Smithfield VA
Upstate, that fly made my day, what a beautiful fly you made there!


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 Post subject: Re: The Yellow Partridge
PostPosted: 03/27/20 07:19 • # 8 
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Joined: 07/23/17
Posts: 264
Location: Missouri Ozarks
jeffkn1 wrote:
upstate wrote:
From Brook and River Trouting by Edmonds and Lee #14.

Image


In Matching the Hatch Schwiebert briefly mentioned the Little Yellow Cranefly and its tendency to emerge on wet days. He recommended the Partridge & Yellow when the Little Yellows were in evidence. It worked well for me in those situations, even in off color water. I usually used one tied with a fur thorax.


Thanks for the tip! Is a really nice tie for sure.


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 Post subject: Re: The Yellow Partridge
PostPosted: 03/27/20 07:48 • # 9 
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Bamboo Fanatic

Joined: 12/31/06
Posts: 1086
upstate wrote:
It would be a shame to crush the barb on a hook that is 75 years old


My thought too. The Allcock 6812 is a rare hook, with a beautiful bend. The barb may be big, but it's a reflection of British industrial design of the time--.

Great job, Tom.


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 Post subject: Re: The Yellow Partridge
PostPosted: 03/27/20 19:33 • # 10 
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Sport

Joined: 06/30/19
Posts: 94
Location: south carolina
numerous studies have shown there is little difference in the time it takes to remove a barbed, vs an unbarbed hook, the time being on the order of 5 seconds or so, and there is virtually no difference in fish mortality due to the barb in the lip. in a deep swallow situation, it is possible the barb will cause more damage when removing the hook. so don't remove the hook. cut the leader and let it rust away. peversely, some studies indicate that a barb reduces the penetration of the hook in smaller fish, as opposed to a chemically sharpened bare one, and reduces the incidence of penetration of the eyesocket and brain in these smaller fish, which results in barbed hook mortality being lower as compared to barbless. the length of time a fish is held out of water, and the loss of scale slime in handling are the biggest factors in fish mortality in a catch and release scenario. proper in water handling is much more important than the style of hook. a quick google search will support these points.

respectfully,


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