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 Post subject: Gus Nevros, 8'6", 3/2/2
PostPosted: 03/26/20 15:58 • # 1 
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Lucked into (and I do mean "lucked", since Gus only built about 300 rods) a Gus Nevros, 8'6", 3 piece, built with two mids, along with the 2 tips and butt. First his rods are spectacular in appearance. I do not think anyone can touch his cosmetics and the carefully wrought attention to detail, coupled with the perfect finish of a Nevros rod, bag, tube and all! Those king and queen turned ferrule plugs, the gold plated engrave butt medallion, the wraps (including the one thread wrap). Second, Gus was a rod designer (and few can say that), this rod is meant to be a 5 weight with one mid and a 6 weight with the other. Gus pulled this off with perfection. Just a wonderful casting rod in both line weights.

I will get pictures out.

Just a gorgeous creation, from a faintly recognized true master of the craft.

Carl


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PostPosted: 03/26/20 23:14 • # 2 
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Carl, that's a real find. I had the pleasure of handling one of Gus's rods and a few emails with him about it way back. Consumate gentleman, extremely knowledgeable maker, and superb product. You're a lucky guy.


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PostPosted: 03/26/20 23:38 • # 3 
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Good for you! He was an absolute gentleman and Master of the craft. Always loved his Greek signature - Man I miss him! He knew Garrison and was perhaps the only person to go behind the scenes with his trusty Leica at both Leonard and Payne in the early 70's... Is it a five-strip? Look forward to seeing some pic's.


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PostPosted: 03/27/20 16:02 • # 4 
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Otto, congratulations on a great find. Gus was a fantastic person and craftsman. I knew him when we both lived in Huntington L.I. in the early 70s. His main outlet then for his rods was the Fireside Angler in Mellville. Here's a copy of his page in the Fireside's 1978 catalog.

Jim


Image


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PostPosted: 03/27/20 16:23 • # 5 
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Jim,

Great reference info!

Stay healthy my friend.

Chris


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PostPosted: 03/27/20 18:16 • # 6 
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Hi Chris, so far so good.

Jim


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PostPosted: 03/31/20 08:36 • # 7 
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As promised here are pictures of the Gus Nevros, 8'6", 3/2/2, penta, with commentary;

His cane color is spectacular, the varnish absolutely perfect.

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Gus believed in using only the best materials and using them in the best possible way. His tubes were heavy walled aluminum and the brass caps were machined (not stamped) with just a little detail.

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His rod bag was a heavy weight soft cloth with a sewn in stiffening rod. Each bag had a pocket in which were inserted two rubber pads to be used in disassembling the rod and also to hold the ferrule plugs. Look at those ferrule plugs!

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His ferrule plugs were made out of Bloodwood and they were king and queen chess piece tops. Note the brass pin at the top that went all the way through to be the armature on which the cork for the plug shaft was adherred to. Imagine turning the tiny king cap with the hollowed in top.

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Of course a Nevros designed cap and ring reel seat over Bloodwood or Olivewood. Note a partial wood seat, he believed the ring should grip into the cork so brought it down into the seat. His rings were thinly machined so the ring flexes onto the reel foot to lock it into place. Look at his wraps.

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He has three wrap sets equally spaced between each fitting and as you go up the rod taper the wrap sections have fewer and fewer thread wraps. It's all about proportion and design.

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Specific information was written on the butt, partly in Greek. His name, rod cane weight, and then my memory fails me.

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Each tip and mid section was designated in Greek. there is not a single air-bubble in any of his wraps. The wraps glow.

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The butt end of the reel seat had inlaided a gold (real gold, yes) medallion with the letter "N" engraved into it for Nevros. You can also see his designed nickel silver butt cap inlaid into the wood of the reel seat so the wood is on both sides of it.

Image
And then the "in your eye" one wrap thread wrap.

Study these photos, a master's work, with much to be leaned.

Carl @ Wanigas Rod Company


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PostPosted: 03/31/20 14:24 • # 8 
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A real stunner, Carl. What a great find. Thanks for the photos.

Bret


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PostPosted: 03/31/20 15:04 • # 9 
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Never saw one of his rods and always wondered why they were so expensive, now I see!
Thanks for taking the time to post.


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PostPosted: 03/31/20 16:49 • # 10 
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DAMN! Gus was the man!


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PostPosted: 03/31/20 17:48 • # 11 
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Gus was at least as fine a gentleman as he was a fine craftsman.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

-----------
Harry Boyd
http://www.canerods.com
maker@canerods.com


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PostPosted: 03/31/20 20:21 • # 12 
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Hi Guys, What a Rod! Thanks for posting.

Jay Edwards


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PostPosted: 03/31/20 20:52 • # 13 
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Thank you for sharing the pics. Absolutely beautiful yes the man was an artist!


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PostPosted: 04/01/20 08:06 • # 14 
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Joined: 01/31/10
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I greatly appreciate the comments and PM's sent my way. Several questions raised;

1) By his own count Gus indicated he made somewhere slightly less than 300 rods.
2) For a time his rods on the open market commanded prices around $3,000, lately they have fallen well below $2K. An unbelievable error on the part of the fickle market, considering the quality of his work and position in the rod building path of history.
2) There was only one way in Gus's mind to build a rod, perfect. He would rather trash a rod anywhere in production then let it get on the street.
3) Yes, he thought of every little thing he did on the rod. His thought process; Why am I doing this? Is it necessary? Can I improve upon it? Is this the best solution?
4) Gus was friends with and had entry into the shops of Everett Garrison, Jim Payne and Leonard. He and his Leica recorded many images of these shops, behind the scenes. These are photos of the actual production of their rods in the shops including the equipment used. I wonder where those are now?
5) When his dear wife, Ruth, became ill they relocated to Cleveland from the New York area for better medical care. He stopped building rods then. At the urging of a number of folks, including members on this forum, he started back up and opened his doors and mind to those showing real interest to his shop and ways of building. He told me this late in life interest from others probably extended his life another decade, especially after Ruth passed, for which he was eternally grateful.

Finally, as many have noted, a man of honor, WWII veteran, old school expectation of others and his treatment of them, a great sense of humor. A first rate and consummate gentleman. One of those people, that hanging out with could not help but make you a better person.

Best,

Carl


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PostPosted: 04/01/20 12:59 • # 15 
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Great info Carl.

Do you know how Gus built his rods? Hand planning or milling? Did someone inherit/purchase his shop and carry on making pentagonal rods?

Adam


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PostPosted: 04/03/20 08:09 • # 16 
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Gus had some exciting stories about escaping from Nazi occupied Greece on a small boat. One of the crew was a Nazi sympathizer and was sabotaging the boat. Gus was about 16 or 17 as I recall and spoke fluent German as he had gone to a German school in Greece. He was sent ashore to get repair parts for the sabotaged boat. He was met by German soldiers and told them he was the son of a German officer and they believed him. They got to Turkey in the boat and they were sent to Alexandria Egypt where the Free Greek Army was headquartered. They tried to draft him into the Greek Army. Gus told them he was an American and would serve in the U.S. Army. He got away and somehow met up with some Americans and got back to the U.S, He then joined the U.S. Army and went back to Germany where he met his future wife whom he dearly loved for the rest of his life.

He was a wonderful human.


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PostPosted: 04/03/20 10:35 • # 17 
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magpie wrote:
Gus had some exciting stories about escaping from Nazi occupied Greece on a small boat. One of the crew was a Nazi sympathizer and was sabotaging the boat. Gus was about 16 or 17 as I recall and spoke fluent German as he had gone to a German school in Greece. He was sent ashore to get repair parts for the sabotaged boat. He was met by German soldiers and told them he was the son of a German officer and they believed him. They got to Turkey in the boat and they were sent to Alexandria Egypt where the Free Greek Army was headquartered. They tried to draft him into the Greek Army. Gus told them he was an American and would serve in the U.S. Army. He got away and somehow met up with some Americans and got back to the U.S, He then joined the U.S. Army and went back to Germany where he met his future wife whom he dearly loved for the rest of his life.He was a wonderful human.

__________________
Now that is a trout fisher and maker's biography that should be expanded upon! Fascinating life!

A tenkara rod, like a pet monkey, seems like a good idea at first.


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PostPosted: 04/03/20 12:09 • # 18 
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Hi Guys, As to Gus Nevros methods of making; I believe he used a mill that belonged to a Garrison student named Baird Foster. I had/have some tips that some here on the forum believe are Foster tips, and he helped with that project. He was very helpful to me.

Jay Edwards


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PostPosted: 04/03/20 19:48 • # 19 
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Carl,

More information of the rod- this was Gus' 50 th rod.

Started in April and inscribed to an early enthusiast in Aug 1983 ,the rod weighed 4.616 oz with the dressing weighing 1.757 oz.- hence the 2.859 oz. inscription. Constructed with Cymel 401 at temperature setting of 260 degrees, the butt mid and tips all had different times in the oven.

The rod bag was made by Ruth.

Gus' approach to rod design and the execution of the rod speaks for itself.

He was a great friend and mentor to us all.

Fung


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PostPosted: 04/04/20 10:43 • # 20 
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Something to aspire too....


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